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FACT: Poor women are leaving the workforce in large part because their work schedules are inflexible or they can’t afford childcare.

FACT: Professional women are leaving because they’re forced to choose between working long hours or being with their children. 

“…More mothers are also now providing for their families. A record 40% of all households with children under the age of 18 include mothers who are either the sole or primary source of income for the family, up from just 11% in 1960. About two-thirds of these “breadwinner moms” are single mothers.
When you ask mothers what their “ideal” working situation would be, most say they would rather work than stay at home, but they prefer part-time work over full-time. And half of all working moms with young kids say that being a working parent has made it harder for them to advance in their careers.”    — Pewresearch.org

FACT:  Companies with more women make higher profits. (workingmomsbreak.com)

Most times, African Women do not depend on men for almost anything… And keeping a family and a job could be very daring for a career woman. Here’s how to manage both…

1. Kill Your Pride About Asking For Help: Even in today’s world, it takes a village to raise a child. Asking for help requires humility, but seeking support can be one of the biggest keys to success. This is especially true for single parents. Successful parents don’t necessarily depend on others, but are often willing to trade favors. For example, they may ask for help driving the kids to soccer practice in exchange for taking over weekend carpool duties for other busy families. When parents arrange for assistance that ensures their kids are being cared for, they’re able to be more productive at work — Amy Morin (Forbes)

2. You Shouldn’t Split Time Equally: Achieving a balance between career and children doesn’t necessarily mean the time is split evenly. Successful parents understand that there will be times when their family will need more attention and times when a career will demand more energy. They don’t try to divide the time equally and fairly. Instead, they remain flexible.

3. Let go of any Guilt: Rather than dwell on how you’re not with your child, think about how your role in the company is benefiting the family.

4. Stay Connected During the Day
Stay connected with your children even when you’re not together. For moms with younger kids, consider recording yourself talking or singing on a video or record your voice reading along to a children’s storybooks. If you’re going to miss or be late to an older child’s event, give her something special in the morning, like a good-luck charm or a personal note. Look into options for filming the event so you can watch it later and not miss a moment. Hang pictures of yourself and your partner so the kids can see your faces. During your breaks at work, call your child; hearing her can help you get through a rough day, and she’ll be comforted to know you’re near.

5. Spend Time With Your Partner And Create Special Family Activities: Remember to nurture your relationship with your partner, who will often be the number one person by your side. Start by having monthly date nights to get closer, feel rejuvenated, and enjoy each other’s company. Often, if you’re busy with work and home, your partner is the first to get neglected. Fostering this relationship will bring back some excitement to the marriage or partnership and help you to “check in” with each other. For some couples, going out on a monthly date can be difficult and expensive, but that doesn’t mean you can’t focus on each other. Have an indoor date night by cooking an elegant meal together or even sitting together with a glass of wine and talking (but not about work or the kids)

Making time for your kids is crucial, both during the week and on the weekends, to nurture your family dynamic and allow everyone to bond. If you’re pressed for time, have a family breakfast or a family night with board games or movies. “Create activities that regularly fit into your schedule so everyone knows what to expect and what to look forward to,” Wiss suggests. When you do have family outings, avoid talking about work or checking your phone. Instead, focus on your kids’ interests such as friends, classes, and hobbies. With older children, ask for their activity suggestions and try to meet their needs. In the end, it doesn’t really matter what you do as long as you do it together.

Credits: hartfordtransit.org || parents.com || forbes.com || workingmomsbreak.com


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